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ATmega & PIC Prototyping PCB
07-26-2015, 06:55 AM, (This post was last modified: 07-27-2015, 06:55 PM by Brendan.)
#1
ATmega & PIC Prototyping PCB
Hey All,

I have a PCB I use for prototyping DIP PIC projects, and it's worked very well for me. However, I've recently wanted to have one that does the same for ATmega. I've re-worked my prototyping PCB to include SMD PIC and ATmega. The PIC pads can support either 20-pin or 8-pin PICS. The ATMega is the venerable 328P. I've broken nearly all the signals out on the two header rows (all except for the XTAL on the ATmega)...from there, it's just a hay-wire away to wherever you want the signal to go on the prototyping area below. The lower pads are all connected (by row) as the silk-screen indicates. This works well for DIP chips, pull-up/down resistors, extra through-hole components, etc.

Note: You can only have a PIC **OR** and ATmega on here at a time...not both. If you NEED both, you could put a DIP 328 or a DIP PIC on the prototyping area below.

If I get any time, I might tinker with the routing...this is largely auto-routed...I know it could be better...but it's a slippery slope into madness! Plus, we're talking about 64Mhz processors here.

I'd welcome any feedback / ideas.

Brendan


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07-27-2015, 10:34 AM,
#2
RE: ATmega & PIC Prototyping PCB
(07-26-2015, 06:55 AM)Brendan Wrote: Hey All,

I have a PCB I use for prototyping DIP PIC projects, and it's worked very well for me. However, I've recently wanted to have one that does the same for ATmega. I've re-worked my prototyping PCB to include SMD PIC and ATmega. The PIC pads can support either 20-pin or 8-pin PICS. The ATMega is the venerable 328P. I've broken nearly all the signals out on the two header rows (all except for the XTAL on the ATmega)...from there, it's just a hay-wire away to wherever you want the signal to go on the prototyping area below. The lower pads are all connected (by row) as the silk-screen indicates. This works well for DIP chips, pull-up/down resistors, extra through-hole components, etc.

Note: You can only have a PIC **OR** and ATmega on here at a time...not both. If you NEED both, you could put a DIP 328 or a DIP PIC on the prototyping area below.

If I get any time, I might tinker with the routing...this is largely auto-routed...I know it could be better...but it's a slippery slop into madness! Plus, we're talking about 64Mhz processors here.

I'd welcome any feedback / ideas.

Brendan

Well, even less, the ATMEGA operates at 16MHz (or 20MHz with an overclock and firmware update I believe) but alas, I like the protoboard!

One thing I might recommend would be throwing a 0805 LED (or similar) + current limiting resistor for a "power signal" or an "on" light basically! (Mainly for a simple glance to see if the 5V and GND rails are "live")
Reply
07-27-2015, 03:03 PM,
#3
RE: ATmega & PIC Prototyping PCB
And you customized it for Spokane create!
You rock!
-Dan

"If you didn't build it, you will never own it." - Barton Dring
Reply
07-27-2015, 06:33 PM,
#4
RE: ATmega & PIC Prototyping PCB
Awesome idea! And very handy! Nice work!
-N8

"I built it because I didn't know I couldn't"
Reply
07-27-2015, 08:54 PM, (This post was last modified: 07-27-2015, 08:55 PM by Brendan.)
#5
RE: ATmega & PIC Prototyping PCB
(07-27-2015, 10:34 AM)CaptainObvious Wrote: One thing I might recommend would be throwing a 0805 LED (or similar) + current limiting resistor for a "power signal" or an "on" light basically! (Mainly for a simple glance to see if the 5V and GND rails are "live")

That's a great idea! I think I can incorporate a "Power on" led with no problem! I'll see about adding one on there!

Brendan

(07-27-2015, 06:33 PM)n8cutler Wrote: Awesome idea! And very handy! Nice work!

Thanks Nate!

(07-27-2015, 03:03 PM)Dan Wrote: And you customized it for Spokane create!
You rock!

Thanks Dan!
Reply
07-28-2015, 06:36 PM,
#6
RE: ATmega & PIC Prototyping PCB
Captain: Here is an updated version with a PWR led (dropper is on the back-side).

Brendan


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07-29-2015, 05:16 PM,
#7
RE: ATmega & PIC Prototyping PCB
Okay, I want one! Fundraiser? Smile
-N8

"I built it because I didn't know I couldn't"
Reply
07-29-2015, 09:33 PM,
#8
RE: ATmega & PIC Prototyping PCB
(07-29-2015, 05:16 PM)n8cutler Wrote: Okay, I want one! Fundraiser? Smile

Ha! If I don't hear any other ideas...I'll order up a batch of 10, and we'll see how they work. I'll probably need to get a batch of ATmega 328p's as well!

Sorry I missed the create evening tonight...had to figure out how to convert sheets into toga's for the Flying Irish run tomorrow with the Sgt. Major...she has a pink toga...of course!

Brendan
Reply
09-01-2015, 10:07 PM,
#9
RE: ATmega & PIC Prototyping PCB
Hey Gang,

My order of ATMega / PIC Proto boards arrived! I had to build a little table-saw to cut the boards...it seems to work okay.

I've built a couple of prototypes up...one running at ATMega 328PAU with Optiboot serial bootloader...programmed with a simple blink sketch using Arduino. It's connected using an FTDI adapter, connected to the serial connector (which also has POWER and GND)

The second board is running a PIC 18F14K50 which is a USB-capable PIC chip...so I used the in-circuit serial programming connector to put a USB bootloader on the chip...then I programmed a simple blink program and downloaded it to the chip via USB. This board is pulling power and data signals from the USB connector.

I used a hot-air gun to solder the ATMega due to the pitch of the pins...I used my soldering iron to solder the PIC chip, as it's more manageable to solder with my particular iron.

I'm stuck in meetings every Wednesday evening with a foreign partner..but I'll see if I can't run these by so you can take a look this Wednesday.

Brendan


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09-02-2015, 08:18 PM,
#10
RE: ATmega & PIC Prototyping PCB
That's awesome! Didn't get a change to look at them tonight, I'll have to look next week.
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